Scary Burda jacket!

I’ve got lots of little projects on the go right now, and lots of work to make sure I don’t finish them, so what’s a girl to do? I know… start another bigger project!

burda jacket 131

Burda Jacket 131, November 2010 issue

I did try searching for a jacket pattern – you know, one that comes in the right size, all ready with seam allowances, neatly folded in a little packet – but this one has stuck in my mind ever since I saw it and nothing else came close. It is Jacket 131 from November 2010 issue Burda Style magazine. This issue has proved to be worth every penny since I have already reaped the patterns for Little Miss Ooobop’s Snow Leopard Coat and her Pinky Purple dress plus there is another skirt and a dress pattern that I quite like the look of… bargain!

There’s a little bit of pressure riding on this one as Mr Ooobop! brought me 2 lovely pieces of fabric last week and I’m determined to do them justice. There are precious few people whom I would trust to choose fabric for me but he gets it right every time and I love that he is so encouraging…and thoughtful. All is forgiven with regards the shrunken skirt!.

The first piece is a charcoal grey wool with cheeky lilac and white pinstripes and this will be the jacket. The second piece is a lighter weight wool in a gorgeous lilac/mauve plaid with a mint stipe running through. This will be a fitted dress to coordinate with the jacket. Well that is the thought for today.

jacket and dress wool

Jacket and dress wool fabric

Panic has already set in. There are 13 pieces for the outer but I am quickly adding the 7 pieces for the lining to make 20 in total and to make sure its not an unlucky sign from the start! Me? Superstitious? Yes! This is the most number of pieces I have ever put to use in one garment. Especially traced from the crazy spaghetti sheet from Burda Style mag. I have faith… honest I do!  I’m beginning to think Mr Ooobop! is right about me always making hard work for myself!

burda pattern lines

Scary Burda pattern lines

I am definitely going to embark on a toile. I have no way of even knowing what goes where at this stage to know where to add an extra inch or two! No semi-acceptable fabric to hand (for a possible wearable toile) either so calico it is but hopefully I can use it as the finished pattern pieces with seam allowances when I’m done. I’m trying not to think that I am effectively going to make this jacket twice!

Already the instructions make no sense half-way through so I am hoping that it will make more sense as I go along. And stand by all of you who have displayed lovely jackets and coats on your blogs, namely Amy, KatKaren, and Catherine to name a few, I will be wailing and pleading for assistance when it all goes pear shaped!

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28 thoughts on “Scary Burda jacket!

  1. Ah, if only all men were like Mr.Ooobop…the world would be a much better place. At this point, I don’t envy you the work you have ahead of you with this jacket. It looks really nice though. As I type this, I am looking at my old Burda magazines, looking for little gems I might have forgotten about. I should make use of my Burda’s more often. It works out way cheaper than buying a pattern for every single thing I want to sew. Goodluck with the jacket, I know you will do a good job.

    • Thanks Dibs. I will pass that on! Every so often I sit down with a cuppa and browse through the back issues. Without fail there is always a little something that says ‘make me’!

    • Absolutely right MrsC. I’m now so glad I used it. It’s very satisfying writing notes and reminders all over it and I also drew on the seam lines which makes life easier too!

  2. Good luck! If you trace the pattern directly on the calico, you can work with stitching lines instead of seam allowances. It’s something that I’ve done in the past to work on fit, but it definitely adds to the time involved if you take it all the way to thread tracing those stitching lines and hand basting underlinings and linings and such. I’m working on a few projects like that, and they are slooooooow.

    • Thanks Amy. I am beginning to accept that this is such a slow project. But you are absolutely right. I did draw on the seam lines in fact I wrote all over each piece…. very satisfying. I will have to look up thread tracing. I have heard of it but never put it into practice. You’ve also got me thinking about underlinings. I hadn’t contemplated them! Eeek. This could be slower than slow!

  3. That was such a good issue of Burda. Funny how some months there’s loads I want to make and others nothing at all.

    Looking forward to seeing the project progress! I usually find toiles go faster than I expect them to.

  4. This pattern is great, I have looked at it too, and ran away afraid of the pattern sheet, lack of seam allowances, and the complexity. I admire you for taking on something so hard!

  5. What a wonderful sort of man to pick out fabric for you – WIN!! 🙂 Definitely do a muslin, I’m so gonna with my first jacket for sure! There’s too many possibilities to oops up lol – it’s worth it for something you’ll likely wear a lot too 🙂

    As for muslin fabric, I just buy old sheets from thrift stores – vv cheap 🙂

    • I am very lucky… especially as he has good taste. Can you imagine if he didn’t ?!!! The muslin is coming along veeery veeery slowly! I always rummage through the odment bin for muslin possibilities but yes, old sheets… and curtain linings too!

  6. Thanks Gail. I think the main issue is the lack of detail in the instruction. I am getting there slowly but surely with the help of other online tutorials and when I’ve cracked another stage it makes perfect sense of course! I’m very happy with the shape its taking and that for sure must be accredited to clever German engineering!

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