ooobop! review: Burda Style November 2013

Burda cover November 2013

Good morning Burda lovers! The sky is blue, the sun is streaming through my window and it’s hard to imagine that we will all be battening down the hatches in preparation for a freak storm tonight. Quite frankly the idea of being house bound for a few days suits me just fine. Mustn’t forget to pop out for emergency supply of spools! 😉

I’m going to start with the cover image because that’s where I gave my first ‘ooo’! Ice-blue wool fleece. It’s just one of the fabric options I’ve been mulling over for my coat, when I eventually get to it. I didn’t really clock the style – it looks fine on the cover – but I think the unfortunate stance of the model in the top left image below, kind of ruins the class and brings on the tent!

This first section is all about Grey. (Even though that coat has an ice blue hue about it on the cover!) I wish I could wear grey with conviction. It does look dramatic, moreso than black, because you can actually see the detail in the cut and style. But it just accentuates my deathly palor. I don’t mind being ‘pale and interesting’ but when people ask if you are feeling ok more than once in a day, you know there’s an issue!

I’m intrigued by the strides (middle row, first col). I love that wrapped-look from the front view. I almost want there to be tails behind. But that amazing mirror prop only serves to highlight how ‘unusual’ they are from the side. Steals every ounce of flattery I’m afraid.

The blazer (centre pic) is a great wardrobe standard. It’s made in a twill weave wool here. Nice and heavy and great paired with skinnies.

And I really like the biker-style jacket in ponte jersey with leather sleeves and trim. (row 2, col 3).

There’s a strong likelihood of an overlocker joining the family soon and so the world of knits is becoming more of interest to me. I have a side-cutter attachment on my machine which doesn’t render the process impossible but it’s just really slow compared to the formula one skills of an overlocker! And I’m just imagining how delightfully speedy that two-piece jersey set would be to run up. It’s an ‘Easy’ one too! In case you think, as I did that its a long sleeve top with under arm air holes, I can confirm that its a sleeveless cowl-neck tank with a separate long-sleeved bias-cut shrug. (col 3, row 1)

Burda 11-13 Grey garmentsIt is heading for that time of year when we need to add a little sparkle to the dark winter nights and days. And party season will be upon us before you know it. So although I’m not favouring much in this next ‘Metallic Mood’ section, it’s inspiring enough to make me go on a treasure hunt for some shiny fabric.

The little cropped jacket (2nd row, 3rd col) is not dissimilar to the Vogue jacket I made recently. Excepting the flared sleeves. And I think if I could get past that fabric it would be a cute cape-like addition in wool or silk.

The skirt, (3rd row, 3rd col) has the same laid in pleats as the strides in the first section, but I can’t see a side view here to see what happens. The gold lamé is a good distraction and defo a new fabric consideration though!

burda 11-13 metallic garments

I need no encouragement to make black clothes. It was my ‘colour’ of choice before sewing and I only sew coloured things because I think I ought to veer away from black. Because black is boring, no? Actually I don’t think it is boring and there’s a part of me that wants to revert to black every winter. The other inner me just fights it off all the time!

And so here temptation is laid before me once again in the shape of the inevitable LBD’s.

I love the idea of a massive silk flower added to an otherwise simple and classy dress. (row 1, col 1) and I really want to incorporate some cotton lace into garments. If I can find some, that is! Looks great on the bodice section of that dress (row 1, col 1). No sweaty pits either!

The line drawing of the fitted dress (row 3, col 1) didn’t sell well to me at all. I didn’t see the point in sewing quite so many sections together unless one is doing some serious colour blocking. But if the effect is a sophisticated dress which moulds to the figure, such as this one. I’m sold!

I quite like the coat dress with it’s low cut V-neck and front snap fastener band too (3rd row, 3rd col). Well, that is of course if somebody would sew on those little darling snap fasteners for me. Serious pet-hate!

I’m not quite sure what’s going on with the crêpe de chine dress (3rd row, 2nd col). It is fundamentally the same as the coat dress but with gathering at the vertical seams and leg of mutton sleeves. A bit too much pouffiness going on for me. Apparently this dress is reminiscent of the ‘wirtschaftswunder’ era. Learn something new every day!

burda 11-13 black garments

Alessia Giacobino is the highlighted designer in this issue. I find these mini Burda features inspiring as I never studied fashion so never had any prompting to delve into the lives of designers. Guilt always overcomes me when I confess (or not) to not having heard of a certain designer. And I love it when I come across one that I truly love. I googled some more on Alessia and I really like her classy, flattering and surprising designs. I’ll leave you to do your own recce. I’m sure you won’t be disappointed.

Burda has supplied patterns for this designer-style outfit below. Imagine how luxurious that washed silk blouse would feel. I think the flounce would annoy me in the front. Would much prefer it at the side. But I do appreciate the detail, nonetheless.

Alessia Giacobino blouse and skirt

It always surprises me, how drawn to campus style I am. I am neither the age or of the leaning towards these fashions so I can only assume that Burda sells them well or that students have properly upped their game recently!

Let’s start with the dress (row 1, col 1). Not dissimilar to some of the summer dresses I have made this year, but with the addition of a midriff (how I love a midriff), a low V-neck, long sleeves and made with a delicious mousseline (a very fine, semi-opaque fabric similar to muslin, apparently). So actually quite different, really! But I do love it!

I also love the cowl neck knit dress (row 2, col 3). Mostly because anything in tartan/plaid makes me go ‘ooo’ right now. And because I am dreaming of being behind the spools of an overlocker soon!

I don’t wear strides. Mostly because I have never found any to fit properly. But if I get the inclination one day, I will definitely be fashioning some like the ones in row 2, col 2.

The wind is starting to pick up now. We’ve got ghostly ‘wooooos’ whispering round the windows. So that’s why I guess I’m being drawn away from ‘classy’ and towards the ‘practical’ of the odd hooded-scarf (row 1 col 2). It’s not knitted but sewn from a knitted fabric and it has pockets too! Might need an overlocker for that one too!

burda 11-13 campus style

Sophistication is definitely the theme for the plus fashions this month. Loving the star-shaped darts in the wool jersey dress (row 1, col 2). The neckline is lovely too and the shoulder line is really sharp. The dress in row 2, col 3 is pretty much the same but with a different neckline, creating a less formal but nonetheless still stylish look.

The tie-waist dress (row1, col 3) is very flattering too. Or is it that I’m just sold on the idea of animal print angora jersey?!

burda 11-13 plus fashions

The kids section is great as always. A great selection of fun, versatile staples for little girls. But what about the boys? Not that I have a little boy but it does seem a little unjust to leave them out.

I’m also a little bit miffed as Little Miss O sits outside these sizes. I tried to make a pair of shorts from a very small ladies size recently but of course the proportions were all wrong and though they fit round the waist, they were massively massive elsewhere. So perhaps I need to attempt to scale up the shorts pattern (row 3, col 1) to see what happens. The dress is super cute too but I am sad to say that most 9 year olds seem to have ditched the dresses for now.

burda 11-13 kids clothes

Well the sun has gone in. The ‘ooos’ are getting a little more howly so I better get finding some patterns… I mean battens!

Keep safe and warm everyone xxx

The Daphne dress

In between the quilting and the vintage dresses and the obsessive pattern buying I’m quite often being art-directed by Little Miss Ooobop! for her next dressing up party outfit. Today was her friend’s birthday party, Scooby Doo was the theme and she wanted to be Daphne.

Daphne from Scooby Doo

Burda Style 10/2010 came in handy, and not for the first time, with a great kids pattern for a long T shirt. The original had a button placket and long sleeves which wasn’t an option for Daphne’s dress. Believe me, LMO does her homework good and proper. The only requested variation was that the dress had short sleeves in case it was sunny. She wasn’ t wrong, that daughter of mine… what a glorious sunny day we had today.

The fabric is a mauve stretch cotton jersey which we found in the first shop we went into! And at £3.99 a metre, a bit of a bargain too! The satin bias trim was from my favourite haberdasher stall in Shepherds Bush market for 40p a metre! No other notions. A v-neckline makes sure of that.

Daphne pose

To alter the pattern I simply cut the the body back and front on the fold, ignoring the placket shape. I lengthened by 4 inches and changed the neckline to a V-shape. And shortened the sleeves of course.

I used the trusty side-cutter to do a faux serge on the seams. Honestly it works like a treat! And I used a stretch stitch to finish the hems on the skirt and the sleeves. I have finished a v-neckline with stretch jersey once before, on my spotty top, and it was great to practice it once again. In fact I think I did a much better job this time!

LMO with missL

The hairband is quite literally a tube of the stretch jersey. A head measurement minus an inch. No elastic involved. I just relied on the stretch of the fabric and it was fine. I wasn’t going to get too bogged down with it as it was going to get ruined by orange hair spray in any case!

The neckscarf is half a metre of finest lime green polyester, seamed all round with a gap for turning! Actually I was lucky to be served half a metre. Apparently only regular customers get that deal!

The only tricky thing about this project was getting said daughter to pose. It’s getting harder and harder to get her to willingly and graciously pose. It normally involves hard cash but today we got off light with a double scoop ice-cream!

Daphne with ice cream

Polka dots for The Redfords

Mr Ooobop! is the bass player of The Redfords and I know I am unashamedly biased but I have yet to see another covers band that top these guys. They have become hugely popular over the last couple of years, with very little self-promotion and almost totally from word of mouth.

They are booked well in advance for weddings, charity do’s and corporate events with each gig self generating at least one other! I love the way they dress up instead of down, looking so dapper in their tuxes. And so imagine how chuffed I was to see these pictures of them wearing the polka dot scarves and pocket patches I made for them.

the redfords matt and jim

The Redfords, Matt and JIm

The Redfords, Dan, (aka Mr Ooobop!)

The Redfords, Dan, (aka Mr Ooobop!)

The Redfords, Dan (aka Mr Ooobop!)

The Redfords, Dan (aka Mr Ooobop!)

The Redfords, Tom

The Redfords, Tom

The Redfords, Matt

The Redfords, Matt

The Redfords, George

The Redfords, George

The scarves are cut from the finest silk(y polyester). Or rather ripped 63cms from the selvedge, the whole 60″ width of the fabric. Then simply folded lengthwise and stitched on the three other sides with a 1.5cm seam allowance, leaving a gap at what will be the centre back edge, for turning. I trimmed the seam, leaving the full SA at the opening and snipped the corners before turning right side out. Following a good pressing I slip stitched the opening and gave it a final pressing. Simples!

The pocket patches, funnily enough, were more tricksy. I used a 2mm rolled hem foot to hem north and south edges and then sewed the east and west edges. It takes a lot of concentration and a lot of ruined pieces to arrive at a nearly perfect hem! I have still to master the perfect corners but thankfully they wont be too closely examined when they are peeking from the pockets of The Redfords!

Kind of infectious, those polka dots! 😉

ooobop! silk necktie

ooobop necktie

ooobop! necktie in Prada silk

Necktie envy set in when my bff Clair swanned into the office, sporting hers, and looking uber glam. I have never given the little things a thought before now, but I think it was the length and the shape of this particular slip of a scarf that got me thinking.

ooobop necktie

ooobop! necktie in Prada silk

And so I shamelessless traced the shape of the little beauty and got pot lucky in the Goldhawk Road this afternoon. Half a metre of Prada silk for £3! I say Prada silk in the loosest sense as it reads PRADA in random pink spots throughout the design of the fabric. It is a bit suspect but Prada or not it is still very lovely silk and appropriate for my get up for the Vintage Festival tomorrow. I am beyond excited and this one last sleep isn’t going to be a very good one as I am slightly beside myself with excitedness!

necktie prada close up

'PRADA' on random polka dots

Not much to report on the making of this tiny project but it was a first for me, sewing with silk and certainly a first creating a baby hem. The BurdaStyle site has been a fantastic resource for me over the last year or so and came up trumps once again with this little baby hem tutorial.

Thanks for popping by. I’m off to soak in a lavender bath and count sheep…. any further tips most welcome!