How do you sharpen your scissors?

Mundial scissors

Mundial scissors

I’m unashamedly jumping on Karen‘s bandwagon to continue the great scissor-sharpening debate.

When I was young, a little man in a van used to call round once a month to see if my mum needed any tools sharpening. He had a little tool shop in the back of his vehicle that serviced any garden shears and dressmaking scissors. I’m sure he fixed other things too but this was service enough for him to be my mum’s knight in shining armour!

I learned very quickly to not use my mum’s tailors shears on paper. She caught me only once and really, she doesn’t get angry at much, but I froze in my tracks and never did it again! Cutting paper really doesn’t do those blades any justice, seriously blunting them. So nowadays I have my paper-cutting scissors and my special fabric-only cutting scissors. My children have also been warned about their sole purposes in much the same scary way that I was!

I am the proud owner of a very sharp pair of Mundial scissors, gold plated handles and all, but one day they will be in need of a sharpen and I wouldn’t have a clue where to go. I would love a little man in a van to come visit me but I think those days are long gone. And so I was elated when Karen posted her article about MacCulloch & Wallis. I very much like the cut of their jib!

But just to add to this, I noted a little tip in Sew and Save, which I picked up in Oxfam recently. . .

Sew and Save

Sew and Save

Get yourself a good pair of scissors to start with. Steel cutting-out schissors with double-sided handles (so that they don’t cut into the joint of your thumb when you are using them) cost about 3/11 a pair. Larger ones for tailoring jobs on heavy materials cust from 7/- to 10/- a pair. Spending money on good scissors is a long-sighted economy, as you will then get cleanly-cut lines and your garment will be well fitting. The scissors should always be kept sharp, of course, and this can be done at home by opening the blades against the neck of a strong glass bottle, and then by closing them slowly as if trying to cut the neck off the bottle. Do this about twenty times, and you’ll get a lovely edge on your scissors.

I would be a bit nervous about trying this on my good ones, given that they cost slightly more than three shillings and eleven, but I tried it on my paper scissors and hey, guess what? It worked! Another good reason to have milk delivered in glass bottles!

How do you sharpen yours?