ooobop! Lucky Hat

lucky hat

I had the perfect sewing window today – Little Miss O at a party for 4 whole hours and a day far too chilly to hang outside for my liking!

But I wont dis the weather – that would be far too predictable for a Londoner – I will embrace it. And so I hatched  a plan to make a hat. I really don’t know how I get through every winter, convinced I don’t suit a hat, and freezing my poor little pixie ears off for the sake of not looking like (more of) an idiot!

So spurred on by the prospect of a toasty bonce coupled with an opportunity to make a minor stash bust but best of all, make a perfect showcase for one of my favourite buttons, the mini mission began!

lucky hat

Mr O had a similar hat – albeit a bit more manly! – so I set about drafting a pattern. I have quite a big head so this was another good reason to make one. If ever I find a hight street hat that I vaguely like, the chances are it will be too small!

Little Miss O found this button in a biscuit tin at a vintage fair in Islington last year. Just a single lonesome button with the word ‘Lucky’ on it. Could sure do with some of that ‘luck’ stuff right now so here’s hoping!

lucky button

It’s got an interesting stamp on the back but I can’t find any reference on line from where it might have come from.

lucky button

To create the decoration, I made a ‘yoyo’, my first one in fact! For those that don’t know,  a yoyo is a circle of fabric (in this case the circle that was cut out for my head hole!) gathered close to the outer edge and pulled tight. The raw edges are tucked inside and some reinforcement stitched sewn. Of course a statement button is a brilliant idea to cover up the scruffy bit in the middle. Velvet is not as manageable as cotton but a few needle pricks later, the result was very acceptable!

lucky hat decoration

I wore my new hat down to our ‘local’ for dinner tonight but didn’t take it off. I was a bit worried about the hat-hair issue. But hey, guess what happened when I took it off when I got home?! Hair looked better than it did pre-hat!

The outer fabric is a cotton velvet, wonderfully donated to me by a friend who was having a clear out. There are many more metres so I am contemplating a matching jacket! Contemplating I said!!

lucky hat

The inside is fully lined with a matching poly lining so it feels really neat. The band was machine stitched, right sides facing and then turned inside like giant bias trim and hand stitched to the seam line, using an uneven slip stitch. The stitches were quite small and sunk into the pile of the velvet so I am very pleased with the results.

I’m pretty sure this kind of hat will go with vintage or modern styles. Just need to make a few more in different colours!

Thanks to the wonderful Mr Ooobop! (of course) for the fabulous photos!

Vintage Simplicity 3320: the toile

simplicity_3320

Simplicity 3320: 1950s dress with 2 skirt variations and detachable collar

I’m not entirely sure what era this dress pattern is, as its listed as 1950s on some sites and 1960s on others. What do you reckon? Not that it really matters. I think its a lovely one in any case and I’ve gone for version 2, Mad Men stylee!

I’m glad I decided to make a toile for this as I really wanted to check out all of the stages properly and for the work involved I want it to work! Everything is going smoothly so far, touch wood. It goes without saying that I’ve had to adjust the waist measurement somewhat . . . oh to have the waist of a small child!

bodice without vestee

bodice without vestee

I didn’t understand the logic behind the construction of the bodice at first. ie: really low v-neck and separate vestee, until I realised the collar was detachable and needs to sit inside, all the way down the neck/front edge. The neckline is faced and the vestee piece is attached to the inside facings with edges bound together.

bodice facings

bodice facings

vestee attached to facings

vestee attached to facings

Of course, the insides will be so much neater when all the edges are bias bound.

I love the shoulder darts on the bodice. Not something that I’ve not come across before on modern pattern pieces, and it’s looking to be a good fit across my back for a change!

shoulder darts

shoulder darts

There are double darts on the skirt back. Not sure why exactly, maybe its just another vintage touch but I think it looks quite classy all the same.

skirt back darts

skirt back darts

The double soft pleats on the skirt front worried me at first. I thought I was going to have to exchange them for darts but decided to leave well alone and retain authenticity as the skirt seems to hang quite nicely and doesn’t poof out at the belly which is always a concern! Apart from that, I have never constructed my own darts before!

full dress toile

full dress toile

Ooops… should have pressed the skirt . . . bit slapdash!

I like the side zipper. I think this is common to vintage dresses. It ultimately means I stand less of a chance of pulling a muscle when I zip up but better still it means the back bodice and back skirt are cut as 1 piece each, quite lucky as I am going to be using plaid. I think that matching up the sides is going to be taxing enough for me!

And as per usual I’ve shortened the length of the skirt, using the proper adjustment line, only this time by an impressive 5 inches . . . and it still retains a vintage length! The vent seems a bit excessive, with an inner pleat that extends to the waist of the skirt, but hey, I wouldn’t have a better solution!

skirt vent

skirt vent

I haven’t totally decided on the fabric for the collar. I bought some navy cotton velvet in anticipation but Mr Ooobop! thinks red. Annoyingly he is right most of the time so I might have to make both.

plaid and velvet

plaid and velvet

Not sure how long it will take me to publish the finished article. It’s not complicated at all, save lots of bias finishing on the inside, just depends on my workload which appears to be growing. Typical when I want to get stuck in to something. Still, not complaining 😉